What’s your level?

When it comes to nutrition, exercise, and healthy choices:

  1. What do you know?
  2. What can you do?
  3. What can (or will) you do… consistently?
  4. Where do you want to go?
  5. What’s realistic for you right now?

Take a moment and think about these questions.

There are no wrong or right answers.

But getting a clear idea of your responses is important, because it will give you an idea of your nutritional and exercise level.

And once you have a sense of your level, you can focus on what matters most to YOU.

Why is this important?

Knowing your level will help you:

  • determine what you should be doing and why
  • understand what’s important to you and what isn’t
  • set realistic expectations and match behaviours to them

The best part is: It never has to be complicated.

In fact, most of the time, basics are best.

Unlike in video games, you never have to advance to a higher level.

(Personally, we think that’s a bit of a relief. You can get great results… while keeping things simple, relaxed, and easy.)

Figure out your level

Maybe you can already guess where you fit.

But if you’re not sure, ask yourself a few questions. And answer them honestly.

Ask yourself 4 questions about your nutrition.

  1. What do I know?
  2. What do I do?
  3. How well do I do this consistently?
  4. What evidence does my body show me about my choices? Am I lean, strong, healthy and mobile? Do I feel good and full of energy?

Ask yourself 4 questions about your exercise.

  1. What do I know?
  2. What do I do?
  3. How well do I do this consistently?
  4. What evidence does my body show me about my choices? Am I powerful, mobile, and uninjured? Performing well athletically?

Ask yourself about your goals.

  1. Where do I want to go?

Work with your nutritional level

There’s no right or wrong level to be at.

What’s most important is that:

  • You know where you fit best.
  • You work with your own abilities.
  • You keep it as simple as possible.
  • You focus on being as consistent as possible.

Keep it simple

Work with the level you’re at. Take it one day at a time.

No need to rush.

Before you run a marathon, you have to learn to crawl.

And even if you’re an experienced runner, you still have to practice the basics.

“One foot in front of the other” applies to everyone. Build a strong foundation, step by step.

Let yourself be a beginner. For now.

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